Is it normal to hate your husband after having a baby?

“I hate you.” It’s a strong phrase loaded with harsh feelings. Yes, sometimes we say it flippantly like “I hate my hair” or “I hate when people try to tell me how to raise my kids” – wait, no, we actually hate that.

Is it normal to not like your husband after having a baby?

Two thirds of parents are less satisfied with their marriage after having a baby, according to a widely-cited 2011 study by famous couples’ therapists, John and Julie Gottman. In fact, it’s so common, that a lot of people think it’s inevitable and acceptable, John Gottman told the American Psychological Association.

Why do I hate my partner after having a baby?

Part of the problem is that you’re tired and have so much less time to spend with your partner than you did before the baby arrived. It’s a lot harder to go out together and enjoy the things you used to do. Your partner may feel left out, and you may resent what you see as a lack of support.

How can I satisfy my husband after giving birth?

If you can’t find someone to look after your baby, take him for a walk in the pram while you talk, or have a meal together once he’s asleep. There are many ways of giving and receiving sexual pleasure. Think about sex as the end point, rather than the beginning. Start with simple things like holding hands and cuddling.

THIS IS INTERESTING:  How long after whooping cough vaccine can I see a baby?

Do couples fight more after a baby?

It’s very common for couples to argue more after the arrival of a new baby. Research shows that first-time parents argue on average 40% more after their child is born. It’s no surprise, really: you’re under more pressure, have less free time and are getting less sleep than usual.

Who comes first child or husband?

1. “My husband must always come before our children.” A spouse’s needs should not come first because your spouse is an adult, capable of meeting his or her own needs, whereas a child is completely dependent upon you to meet their needs.

Is it normal to hate your life after having a baby?

1 in 7 new mothers will experience a postpartum mood disorder, and sometimes that depression and anxiety may be because of the event and day to day life of being a mom not “living up to the hype.” A lot of mothers struggle and don’t talk about it due to embarrassment and shame.

What kills a relationship faster?

1. Blame and shame. Aside from all-out abusive behavior, blaming and shaming may be the fastest way to kill your connection. Both behaviors communicate contempt for your partner, displaying that you view him or her as beneath you or deserving of scorn.

Mom's sun